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Don’t Let Dental Fears Prevent You from Regular Dental Check-Ups

Posted by on Jan 17, 2019 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Don’t Let Dental Fears Prevent You from Regular Dental Check-Ups

  If the thought of going to the dentist causes dental fears or distress, you’re not alone. Up to 75 percent of adults in the United States report having some degree of dental fears – anxiety and five to 10 percent of those with anxiety are considered to have a dental phobia. Those individuals experience dental fears so badly that they avoid going to the dentist at all costs, which is detrimental to their oral health and to their overall health. Read on to understand what dental phobia is. Dental Fears Can Put Your Oral and Overall Health at Risk Regular dental exams, teeth cleanings, dental X-rays and proper hygiene, will help keep your teeth and gums healthier. Fear of pain in the dentist’s chair may be what keeps patients with dental phobia from scheduling an appointment. In truth, you are less likely to develop painful problems such as cavities, gingivitis and periodontal disease if you go to the dentist for routine check-ups at least once a year. Another reason to see the dentist on a regular basis is because poor oral health has been linked to a greater risk of overall health problems. Infection from decayed teeth and gum disease can get into the bloodstream and cause major health problems, such as heart disease, strokes, and even death. Causes of Dental Fears and Dental Phobia In many cases, people who experience dental phobia do so because of prior experiences at the dentist’s office, such as feeling pain during a procedure or fear of the sounds or smells in the dentist’s office. Follow this link to learn more of what causes dental phobia. If you haven’t been to the dentist for a while, you may be happy to know that modern dental care is quieter, gentler and more comfortable than it was in days gone by. Modern dentists use technology that has taken the bite out of procedures that were at one time painful.   For those with dental fears or dental phobia, even taking dental x-rays might be trigger anxiety. That is not the case in today’s world. Dr. Terrance Wolbaum of Pioneer Hills Dental, takes digital x-rays of your mouth by using a small sensor which records the image of your teeth and sends it to a computer. It is quick, painless and far more accurate than the x-rays of yesteryear. His office provides a wide variety of dental state- of-the-art services. Follow this link for more information regarding what we offer to help all of our patients.   Additionally, Dr. Wolbaum is able to provide personalized, compassionate care for his patients struggling with dental phobia. This means that you won’t have to compromise the health of your teeth and gums due to dental fears that may have plagued your dental care in the past. Check out his website to get a better idea of who Dr. Wolbaum is, and see for yourself that care and compassion are a running theme for all of his patients. Treatment of Dental Phobia There are a number of ways to treat dental fears and phobia. The following are some helpful tips to a successful dental appointment:  Have a Discussion  Prior to Your Dental Treatment so You Know What to Expect During the Procedure Modern dentists, such as Dr. Wolbaum, help...

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How Fluoride Fights Cavities

Posted by on Jan 11, 2019 in fluoride treatment | 0 comments

How Fluoride Fights Cavities

Fluoride is a mineral found naturally in the Earth’s crust. It is also found in ground and ocean water along with other sources, and it helps prevent tooth decay in people of all ages. Fluoride not only prevents tooth decay, it can even reverse it. The American Dental Association (ADA) has referred to it as “nature’s cavity fighter”.  Fluoridated toothpaste and your city’s tap water are likely the most effective cavity-prevention measures available today. What Does Fluoride Do? Dental plaque is a sticky, colorless film of bacteria that combines with food and drinks that contain sugar or starch, such as milk, bread, cookies, candy, soda, juice, and many others. Whenever we eat or drink something that contains sugar or starch, the bacteria uses those foods to produce acids that begin to eat away at the tooth’s hard outer surface, or enamel. The minerals in our saliva, (calcium and phosphate), along with fluoride from toothpaste and tap water, helps the enamel repair itself by replacing minerals lost during an acid attack (remineralization). Our teeth go through this natural process of losing minerals (demineralization) and regaining minerals (remineralization) all day long. Fluoride offers three methods of protection against decay. Aiding tooth remineralization Hardening teeth It has an obstructive effect on the kinds of bacteria that cause cavities In-Between Meal Snacking = Acid Attack on Your Teeth If you nibble a lot between meals and drink soft drinks, energy drinks or juice throughout the day, your teeth are exposed to acid frequently. Food and drinks containing sugar and starches cause the protective enamel to continue to lose minerals throughout the day. Over time, a white spot might appear on your tooth where minerals have been lost. This is a sign of early decay, but tooth decay can be stopped or reversed at this point. Enamel can repair itself by using minerals from saliva, and fluoride from toothpaste or other sources, however, if the tooth decay process continues, more minerals are lost. Over time, the enamel is weakened and destroyed, forming a cavity, which is permanent damage that has to be repaired with a filling. We Can Learn How to Care for Our Teeth from Past Civilizations There is evidence that the people of Pompeii in 70 A.D., had nearly perfect teeth. Archeological studies attribute the good quality of their teeth to the fact that they had a low-sugar diet, rich in fruit and vegetables, along with fluorine in a local water source. Nutritious foods with very little sugar is a good formula for beautiful teeth during any time period, as cited in Business Insider. Bottled Water Is Likely Not Fluorinated If you only drink bottled water, you could be missing the decay-preventive benefits of fluoride, according to the American Dental Association. Many brands of bottled water aren’t fluoridated, so fluoride supplements might be needed to prevent cavities. Regular Dental Check-ups Will Help You Know Where You Stand Regular dental check-ups every six months are vital to your oral health and will indicate whether or not your teeth are lacking fluoride or prone to cavities. Dr. Terrance Wolbaum of Pioneer Hills Dental in Aurora, Colorado is a general and family dentist. He and his team are passionate about helping you and your family receive comprehensive care; focusing on prevention, tooth preservation, and awareness...

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Four Ways Pioneer Hills Dental Can Support Your Oral Care Needs  

Posted by on Jan 5, 2019 in healthy teeth | 0 comments

Four Ways Pioneer Hills Dental Can Support Your Oral Care Needs  

  Choosing a dentist to support your healthy teeth goals can feel like an overwhelming task when you are facing a community full of dentists. How do you choose? Location is important. You don’t want excessive travel time to and from the dentist. Pioneer Hills Dental is a General and Family dentistry practice at the Pioneer Hills Shopping Center in Aurora, Colorado. If you are new to the area, our practice is located at 5492 South Parker Road, which is convenient access for patients in the Highlands Ranch, Aurora, Castle Rock and Lone Tree communities. Whether you are new in town, or just looking for a new dentist, Dr. Terrance Wolbaum of Pioneer Hills Dental is accepting new patients and offers the skills and expertise to take care of all your oral care needs and help you maintain healthy teeth. About Dr. Wolbaum After graduating from Dental School at the University of Colorado School of Dental Medicine, Dr. Wolbaum completed a General Practice Residency in San Francisco. When he returned to Colorado, he focused on the dental needs of the underserved in Greeley, Colorado, and also acted as a clinical instructor to dental students in Colorado and Arizona. Dr. Wolbaum is currently affiliated with the following dental organizations: American Dental Association Colorado Dental Association International Congress of Oral Implantologists Metropolitan Denver Dental Society New Dentist Committee Everyone Needs a Good Dentist! No one can dispute the fact that everyone needs to have a good dentist, yet recent polls indicate that 36 percent of the people in the United States don’t go to the dentist on a routine basis. Did you know that dental check-ups are an essential part of your overall health and wellness plan for healthy teeth? Therefore, finding the right dentist is vital to your well-being. Did you know that poor oral health puts you at risk for heart disease and strokes? Follow this link for more information regarding the association of poor oral health and heart disease. Bacteria is present in everyone’s mouth, but the bacteria that causes periodontal disease can actually get into your bloodstream, causing the arteries to build up plaque and harden (atherosclerosis). This condition can lead to heart blockages, increasing the likelihood of a heart attack or the risk of a stroke. The following are four of the outstanding reasons Dr. Wolbaum should be your dentist! General and Family Dentistry Dr. Wolbaum is passionate about helping you achieve and maintain optimal oral health, which results in a beautiful smile. He does that through a variety of preventative methods and dental treatments such as: Diagnostic and preventive care Regular dental cleanings and X-rays Oral cancer screening Teeth whitening, tooth colored fillings, and veneers Invisalign® Crowns and bridges Root canals and extractions Dentures and Partials Implant placement and restoration Night guards and mouth guards Root Planing and scaling Dr. Wolbaum provides many services that in the past would have required a specialist. With his skill and expertise, you are able to go to Pioneer Hills Dental for most, if not all, of your oral care needs to support healthy teeth. Click here for a complete list of services Dr. Wolbaum provides. Cutting Edge Technology Dr. Wolbaum uses the most advanced dental technologies available, such as the intraoral camera.  This camera is about the size of a pen and due to...

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New Year’s Resolution: Schedule a Dental Check-Up

Posted by on Dec 28, 2018 in Dental Check-Up, dental exams | 0 comments

New Year’s Resolution: Schedule a Dental Check-Up

New Year’s Resolution: Schedule a Dental Check-Up When it comes time to set your new year resolutions, put a dental check-up on the list!  One of the simplest and most effective resolutions you can make is to schedule a dental check-up.  Good oral hygiene is obviously something that will make a difference in your life, but you might not be aware of just how much of a positive effect it can have on your whole health. How Your Gums and Teeth Affect Your Overall Health Certain warning signs reside in your mouth and a routine dental check-up may reveal unknown problems with your heart, blood sugar, and inflammation. Regular dental check-ups are not only good for your dental health, but for your overall health too. (WebMD shares a story about a patient who went for a dental check-up and now credits her dentist with saving her life). A Dental Check-Up is a Snapshot of Your General Health Dr. Terrance Wolbaum, of Pioneer Hills Dental, performs a comprehensive examination during a routine check-up. Part of the check-up, includes an oral cancer screening where Dr. Wolbaum checks for any lumps or irregular tissue changes in your neck, head, face, and oral cavity. When examining your mouth, he will also look for any sores or discolored tissue, and of course he checks the condition of your teeth and gums. If you are a new patient, he performs a benchmark check-up as a starting point. For returning patients, he looks for any changes from previous examinations that may indicate a problem in your overall health. According to the American Dental Association (ADA) you should have a professional cleaning and check-up every six months. Scheduled times are set at specific intervals because tooth decay develops in a predictable pattern. Once plaque transforms into tartar, it can only be removed by dental professionals. Depending on the condition of your teeth and gums, you may need to schedule appointments more than twice a year, that’s why it’s important to have a routine check-up with Dr. Wolbaum to see what he recommends for YOUR teeth. Oral and Physical Health Connections to be Concerned About Inflammation and Infection in Your Body Poor oral health has been linked to the advancement of infection in other parts of the body. Research has found an association between gum disease and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an autoimmune disease that causes inflammation of the joints. According to experts, the mechanism of the destruction of connective tissues in both gum disease and RA is similar. Eating a balanced diet, regular dental check-ups, and good oral hygiene helps reduce your risks of tooth decay and gum disease that can advance other diseases or conditions. A Healthy Mouth May Lower Your Risk of Heart Disease Chronic inflammation from gum disease has also been associated with the development of cardiovascular problems. Recent studies at the Boston School of Dental Medicine indicate that periodontal disease is now recognized by the cardiology community to be a direct risk factor for coronary arterial disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke. The common link to these and other diseases is inflammation from periodontal disease. The findings in these studies suggest that maintaining good oral health can help protect overall health. Diabetes People with diabetes who don’t control their blood sugar levels well, often have...

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If You Snore, Your Health May be at Risk!

Posted by on Dec 20, 2018 in sleep apnea, snoring | 0 comments

If You Snore, Your Health May be at Risk!

Snoring is a common problem which deprives you AND your partner of a good night’s sleep. Snoring is more than just an annoyance, it can also be harmful to your health. Of the 90 million Americans who suffer from snoring, half of those may have sleep apnea. Scientific data suggests that people with sleep apnea are twice as likely to have heart disease and fatal heart attacks. If you snore, you likely have a dry throat when you wake up in the morning. Do you have insomnia, frequent headaches, foggy thinking or drowsiness during the day, and/or shortness of breath when you wake up? If any of this sounds familiar, it would be wise to make an appointment with Dr. Terrance Wolbaum of Pioneer Hills Dental in Aurora, Colorado. He is a skilled general and family dentist, experienced in correcting this annoying, and possibly dangerous, health issue. Check out his website to find ways he can help to improve the quality of your sleep. What Are the Health Risks Associated with Frequent Snoring? Snoring is a symptom of other potentially serious health issues. You snore when there is a narrowing of the airways while you sleep. Often, it is because you are breathing through your mouth, or your nasal passages and throat are obstructed, reports WebMD. The following are a few of the health risks related to snoring and sleep apnea: Heart strain – Continued suffering from obstructive sleep apnea often results in higher blood pressure and may cause enlargement of the heart, with increased risks of heart attack and stroke. Poor night’s sleep – This leads to drowsiness during the day and can interfere with your ability to work, drive or think clearly, which adversely affects your quality of life. Low oxygen levels in the blood – Low oxygen can lead to constricted blood vessels in the lungs, which can lead to pulmonary hypertension. Chronic headaches – People with chronic daily headaches are almost twice as likely to be chronic snorers. This might be due to grinding your teeth or clenching your jaw, both symptoms Dr. Wolbaum is qualified to help you with. Sleep Apnea and Snoring It’s important to remember that snoring is a symptom of another issue. Snoring is likely related to sleep apnea; a disorder that causes you to stop breathing hundreds of times per night for a second or two, during sleep. Those constant interruptions to sleep are what causes drowsiness and the feeling of being foggy. This condition is dangerous because every time you stop breathing, there’s a possibility that your brain won’t tell you to start breathing again. Studies show that when you have sleep apnea you have three times the risk of death compared to those without sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is a serious issue that should not be ignored! Dr. Wolbaum Can Help You with Your Snoring Problem! The majority of over 90 million Americans with sleep disorders are sleep apnea sufferers. If you fall into that category, contact Dr. Wolbaum at Pioneer Hills Dental for a free consultation to talk about snoring and your health! Experts agree that your dentist can set you on the path to overcoming your sleep disorders. He will start by looking at the composition of your teeth, gums, throat, and jaw to identify the causes of...

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Give Yourself a Healthy Mouth for the Holidays

Posted by on Dec 14, 2018 in Healthy Mouth, healthy teeth | 0 comments

Give Yourself a Healthy Mouth for the Holidays

  One of the best gifts you can give yourself this holiday season is the gift of a healthy mouth. A healthy mouth is important for so many reasons. To have a mouth that is free of disease and pain is incalculable, yet it is something you can’t purchase. Dedication and effort is the price you pay to enjoy the benefits of a healthy mouth. During the holidays it’s easy to skip your normal routines that maintain a healthy mouth. Hectic schedules filled with school programs, friends and family, office parties, and shopping can cause you to forget the importance of dental health. Flossing and brushing may be overlooked, and the stress from all the added commotion can lead to grinding your teeth and clenching your jaw, which causes a myriad of issues. Gifts for a Healthy Mouth Dr. Terrance Wolbaum of Pioneer Hills Dentistry has made the following list of gifts you can give to yourself this year. These gifts will help you preserve your oral health throughout the holidays and beyond. Gift #1 – A travel-sized toothbrush and toothpaste, and a small toiletry bag is the perfect gift to bring to work. Keep them in your desk, purse or briefcase and brush your teeth after lunch. Brushing will help keep your mouth fresh and clean (and will give you the chance to see that piece of broccoli stuck in your tooth before your boss does.) Maintaining healthy teeth and gums on a daily basis requires brushing your teeth at least twice a day and flossing once a day, preferably before bedtime. Gift #2 – If you can’t brush your teeth, a package of sugarless gum is a gift you should keep on hand. Studies have shown that chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes following meals can help prevent tooth decay.  Gum increases the production of saliva, which washes away food and other debris and counteracts acids produced by bacteria in the mouth. Saliva also provides disease-fighting substances throughout the mouth which carries more calcium and phosphates to strengthen tooth enamel. Chewing gum will also prevent you from eating more food. Gift #3 – Christmas parties that have a cheese and meat tray is a gift for those who want to strengthen their teeth!  The calcium in cheese is good for your teeth and meat is a great source of protein, which can help your body fight tooth decay and will keep your teeth strong and healthy. Gift #4 –Avoid crackers with that cheese. Starchy foods will get trapped in your teeth and create the perfect storm that leads to plaque build-up.  If you eat chips and baked goodies, rinse your mouth after eating and be extra diligent when you brush and floss to remove all the food particles that would threaten a healthy mouth. Gift #5 – Fresh fruit is a good alternative to all the cookies, cakes and goodies and it can satisfy the craving for sweets. Fruit is naturally sweet but also contains lots of beneficial plant compounds and fiber, allowing you to have your sugar fix and preserve your healthy mouth / healthy teeth goals. Gift #6 – Raw vegetables are loaded with vitamins and nature’s gift to strengthen your tooth enamel. Veggies such as celery and carrots are also good to help remove bacterial...

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That Headache You Have Could Be Related to Your Teeth

Posted by on Dec 7, 2018 in Bruxism, headache, Headache and Bruxism | 0 comments

That Headache You Have Could Be Related to Your Teeth

  Headaches and bruxism affect thousands of the American population.  How is it possible to have a headache even before you get out of bed? Bruxism is the act of clenching the jaw or grinding the teeth during sleep, and that could be the cause of your headaches. Bruxism is a dangerous dental problem that can lead to a host of other issues  besides headaches, such as tooth wear and broken teeth, and it can also do damage to the bone structure of the jaw joint with temporomandibular joint syndrome (TMJ syndrome). Sleeping with a clenched jaw exerts excessive force of 200 pounds of pressure on the teeth and jaw joints. No wonder you have a headache! Researchers concluded that those who grind their teeth and clench their jaw tend to feel more stressed at work and in their daily life, and, seem to deal with stress in a negative way. Bruxism affects up to 10 percent of the population, and according to research, those who suffer from this common, but incapacitating problem, need intervention from a dentist to avoid the long-term effects on your overall health. Headaches and Bruxism  These symptoms often go untreated because who would think that chronic headaches are caused by tooth grinding or clenching your jaw? Putting an end to the clenching or grinding of your teeth requires a dental evaluation. If you suffer from frequent headaches or migraines, make an appointment to see Dr. Terrance Wolbaum of Pioneer Hills Dental in Aurora, Colorado. As a qualified dentist, Dr. Wolbaum can determine if bruxism is the cause of your headaches and offer other solutions, such as a custom night guard designed to protect your teeth while you sleep. This will curb bruxism symptoms, and eliminate headaches. Additional treatments can also focus on stress and other contributors, which may further alleviate tension headaches. Check out our website to learn more about bruxism and Dr. Wolbaum’s method of treatment for it.   Do You Have Bruxism? People can suffer from bruxism for a long period of time and not know it. If you have stress headaches or migraines and you suspect that you’re clenching your jaw or grinding your teeth, contact our office.  During your consultation, Dr. Wolbaum will inquire and check for other symptoms of bruxism as follows: Other Common Symptoms of Bruxism Besides Headaches   Pain in your teeth and tooth sensitivity to pressure, heat, and cold   Chipping or cracking teeth, especially on surfaces where teeth come in contact   Aching jaw and facial muscles, along with stiffness in the jaw early in the morning   Poor quality of sleep   Earache, tinnitus and sinus pains   Stiff neck and shoulders If left untreated, bruxism can have long-term effects, and plague you with symptoms that are almost unbearable. Allow Dr. Wolbaum to help restore you to a better-quality life. With the proper treatment, he can help alleviate your symptoms. Some of the long-term effects are found below: Long-term Effects of Bruxism   Prolonged untreated headaches and migraines   Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMJ)   Clicking or popping jaw joint   Tooth wear and tooth loss Your teeth should last for a lifetime; however, bruxism is a destructive condition that wears them down. If you have a headache when you wake up, notice unusual wear on your teeth or otherwise suspect that you have the symptoms of bruxism,...

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Brushing Teeth: Do’s and Don’ts

Posted by on Nov 28, 2018 in brushing and flossing | 0 comments

Brushing Teeth: Do’s and Don’ts

Brushing teeth is easy, right? Even though you’ve been brushing your teeth for years, you might be surprised to find that you’re not doing it properly. Dr. Terrance Wolbaum, of Pioneer Hills Dental, provides oral hygiene instruction as part of preventative care instruction for his young patients. Adults may need a refresher too! The following are some guidelines from the American Dental Association (ADA) for brushing teeth properly. Good brushing habits help to avoid oral health problems such as tooth decay, gum disease and bad breath or other oral diseases. Wait 30 Minutes After Eating Acidic Foods Before Brushing Teeth Brushing teeth right after eating certain foods can adversely affect your tooth enamel.  According to the Mayo Clinic, if you’ve eaten anything that is acidic, you should avoid brushing teeth for at least 30 minutes. Foods containing citric acid, like citrus fruits, weaken tooth enamel. Brushing teeth too soon after eating foods can damage the enamel in its already weakened state. This same guideline goes for that hamburger you just washed down with a soda. The acids from soft drinks, juice, energy drinks, etc., have the same damaging effect on your teeth. Brushing teeth too soon after eating can further damage the enamel that cannot be replaced. While you are waiting to brush your teeth, rinse your mouth with water. This will help to remove food residue that is left behind and it will also dilute the acid that can start eating away at your tooth enamel before you can safely brush your teeth. Gently Brush Teeth with Fluoride Toothpaste Twice a Day for Two Minutes You heard it right. Likely, we all know brushing teeth twice a day is recommended, but did you know you should hang in there for two minutes each time? This should be done especially first thing in the morning and before bedtime using a soft bristled toothbrush. Flossing should occur once a day and bedtime is the recommended time. This will prevent food and debris from remaining in the crevices of the teeth overnight. The combination of brushing teeth and flossing could prevent the build-up of plaque, which is the main cause of tooth decay. Guidelines for Brushing Teeth from the ADA The following are some simple guidelines the ADA offers for brushing teeth properly: Your toothbrush should be at a 45°angle along the gum line. Move it in a back and forth motion, and repeat for each tooth. Brush the inside surface of each tooth, using the same back and forth method. Brush the chewing surface (top) of each tooth. Use the tip of the brush to brush behind each tooth — front and back, top and bottom and up and down strokes. Be sure to brush your tongue to remove odor-causing bacteria. You might have to set a timer for two minutes in order to brush for the recommended time, or turn on your favorite song that lasts for two minutes, but do what it takes. Ultimately, brushing teeth adequately will help to preserve your pearly whites now and in the future. Properly Store Your Toothbrush After Brushing Teeth After brushing teeth, be sure to thoroughly rinse your toothbrush to make sure there is no debris or toothpaste left on it. Store it in an upright position and let it air dry. Leaving it exposed...

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Give Thanks for Modern Dentistry

Posted by on Nov 24, 2018 in modern dentistry | 0 comments

Give Thanks for Modern Dentistry

Thanksgiving is a time to pause and think about the many things we have to be grateful for. Counted among those things, are the advancements made in dental services that are available today. Until 1938 toothbrushes were made of animal hair bristles. It wasn’t until then that nylon toothbrushes made with synthetic bristles, were available. Naturally, people preferred the nylon synthetic toothbrushes because they were softer and more hygienic. Early dental procedures were done with unsophisticated simplistic tools, often in unsanitary conditions.  There was no such thing as antiseptic, anesthesia or sedation dentistry either. It was considered a normal part of dental treatment to feel pain, both by the dentist and by the patient, and the fear of pain was the main reason why many avoided going to the dentist. Dentistry Has Changed Surprisingly, most Americans did not regularly brush their teeth until after World War II and the loss of teeth was considered a normal function attributed to old age. Preventive dentistry plays a major role in modern dentistry and can help people keep their teeth for the extent of their lifetime. Now, a majority of Americans not only focus on the health aspects of keeping their teeth clean, but many are also concerned about the cosmetic appearance of their smile. Modern dentistry has changed all of that! Nitrous Oxide Controls Anxiety and Pain In today’s world, dental procedures are routine and painless whereas in the past they were complex and lengthy ordeals that required extensive recovery time. Today there are medications and methods that can reduce or eliminate pain and control anxiety during most procedures. Nitrous oxide, is a safe and effective short-term sedative to help you relax during dental treatment. Often referred to as “laughing gas”, it is an option available to help you feel more comfortable during restorative procedures. Advances in Modern Dentistry We have many ways to prevent dental care problems and to treat issues when they develop with modern dentistry. Aurora, Colorado, dentist, Dr. Terrance Wolbaum, of Pioneer Hills Dentistry, provides the kind of dental care we can give thanks for. Gone are the days of crude dentistry practiced as recently as the 1950’s and 1960’s.  The following are a few of the methods Dr. Wolbaum uses to treat his patients. Intraoral Camera Diagnoses Your Mouth in Precise Detail Intraoral cameras are a form of technology that has changed the way Dr. Wolbaum diagnoses a problem in your mouth. The camera is about the size of a pen that fits inside your mouth. The camera provides a magnified image of your teeth that is then displayed on a computer screen, which allows you to see what the dentist is looking at.  This technology allows the dentist to see more clearly the condition of your teeth and gums so he can better diagnose dental problems and use more precision when treating chips, cracks and fillings. CEREC – Same Day Crowns Permanent dental crowns can be made in the dental office during one visit. Dr. Wolbaum and his staff can now create natural-looking ceramic crowns in their office. Chairside Economical Restoration of Esthetic Ceramics (CEREC) is a high-tech system used to design and make high-quality, metal-free dental restorations in one appointment. CEREC utilizes 3D photography and CAD/CAM technology to help Dr. Wolbaum design a virtual...

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Is Your Genetic Code Playing a Part in Your Oral Health Problems?

Posted by on Nov 16, 2018 in oral health | 0 comments

Is Your Genetic Code Playing a Part in Your Oral Health Problems?

Genetics may play a bigger role in your oral health than you think. It’s possible that you inherited more than your dark hair from your father.  You may also have an increased likelihood for problems with your oral health. Many issues with your oral condition can be linked to genetic factors, leaving you at higher risk for problems with your teeth and gums, regardless of your personal habits in caring for your teeth. Oral Health Conditions Can Run in the Family Dental hygiene and how you care for your teeth are not a genetic conditions. Those habits are something you learn from your family. Other conditions, however, may be something you’ve inherited.  The following are a few conditions of the mouth that are scientifically proven to have a genetic component. Gum disease can be linked to genetic factors. In fact, up to 30 percent of the people in the United States are susceptible to gingivitis or periodontal disease, genetically. Let your dentist know if gum disease runs in your family. There is a genetic test that can determine how vulnerable you are to this problem.  Although gum disease can be genetic, good oral hygiene, brushing your teeth twice a day, flossing every day and regular dental checkups, can keep the plaque buildup that leads to gum disease in check. Crooked or misaligned teeth are obviously linked to genetics when you inherited your dad’s overbite or your mom’s crooked teeth. The misalignment of your teeth or bite is more than a cosmetic problem. It can be detrimental to your dental health, causing headaches, TMJ disorder, tooth decay, and gum disease. Straightening your teeth can improve your general health and it also improves your oral health. Dr. Terrance Wolbaum of Pioneer Hills Dental is a certified Invisalign® dentist who can help straighten your teeth to help you achieve a beautiful smile and a healthy mouth. Contact his office at (303) 766-8811 to set up an appointment for a free initial consultation to determine if Invisalign® is the solution to your misalignment.  Tooth decay is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide. In spite of good oral hygiene, up to 60 percent of tooth decay can be linked to genetic factors. Before you blame the problems in your mouth solely on grandpa, scientific studies say the overall health of your teeth depends on a combination of genetics, good dental hygiene and the use of fluoride. The bottom line? Do what you can to prevent tooth decay. Enjoy a healthy diet (and follow the recommendations listed below).  If you are following these general guidelines, and still struggle with some of these issues, your dentist can help you stay on top of the problems before they get out of hand. Oral Cancer includes any kind of cancer that occurs in the mouth, throat, cheeks and tongue. Research suggests the probability for oral cancer to run in families. Although a family history of cancer increases your risk of developing mouth cancer, that is not the only factor. You also increase your risk by smoking, chewing tobacco and excessive use of alcohol. These substances are all carcinogenic, and they contain chemicals that can damage the DNA in cells that lead to cancer. Annual oral cancer screenings take five minutes and can be done in tandem...

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